Dr. Lynda Geller

psychologist (Spectrum)

autism therapy - spectrumservicesnyc.com

Dr. Lynda Geller

psychologist (Spectrum)

Dr. Geller is a clinical psychologist specializing in Autism Spectrum Disorder and the unique challenges it presents in both individual struggle and public perception. Having worked most of her professional career at various medical schools with this population, she founded Spectrum Services, a group of professionals dedicated to providing individualized services to children and adults on the autism spectrum.

When children are undiagnosed and untreated, their outcome is severely affected and, as they enter adulthood the contrast between intellect and social understanding can be to bewildering to others. Among the goals of Spectrum Services are understanding difficult diagnoses, developing individualized services, and providing an understanding of the condition and its very significant impacts to the individual and his or her world.

Dr. Geller currently works primarily to assist in legal cases where the defendant is on the autism spectrum to elucidate for prosecutors and judges the unique aspects of these conditions and the effects on cognition, competency, culpability, and social understanding that may result.  She evaluates individuals who have been charged with criminal behavior to explain how their autistic characteristics affected their understanding of their behavior and provides expert testimony.  She has worked on cases as diverse as stock fraud, internet trolling, child pornography, and underage sexting.

Autism & Aspergers
“The impulse to heal is real and powerful and lies within the client. Our job is to evoke that healing power… and support it in its expression and development. We are not the healers. We are the context in which healing is inspired.”
- Ron Kurtz

Trauma

“Trauma is not what happens to us, but what we hold inside in the absence of an empathetic witness...Trauma is about loss of connection—to ourselves, our bodies, our families, to others, and to the world around us. This disconnection is often hard to recognize because it doesn't happen all at once but rather over time.”
- Peter Levine